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Mine Disasters in
the United States


Shoal Creek Coal Company
Shoal Creek No. 1 Mine Explosion

Panama, Illinois
November 25, 1910
No. Killed – 6



Successful Rescue

Fifty men who were working in the section of the Shoal Creek No. 1 Mine where the explosion occurred were rescued after an undisclosed period according to the mine management.  Six miners died in the incident.


Five Dead, 18 Hurt, In Mine
The New York Times, New York, NY
November 12, 1910

Hillsboro, Ill., Nov. 11. -- Five miners were killed and eighteen were injured in an explosion this morning in the Shoal Creek Coal Company’s mine at Panama, a mining town in the southern part of Montgomery County.  Fifty men, working in the section of the mine where the explosion occurred, were rescued.  Altogether 350 men were under ground at the time, but 300 of them were in no danger.

The cause of the explosion is not known.  The dead and injured were burned by the flames of the explosion, but the mine was not set on fire.


Four Miners Killed in an Illinois Mine
The Duluth News Tribune, Duluth, MN
November 12, 1910

Hillsboro, Ill., Nov. 11. -- Four miners were killed and 10 were injured in an explosion this morning in the Shoal Creek Coal Company’s mine at Panama, Montgomery County.

Fifty men who were working in the section of the mine where the explosion occurred, were rescued, according to the mine management.  Although 350 men were underground at the time but 300 of them were in no danger.

The cause of the explosion is not known.

The dead: J. Wilbur, Jacob Herman, Joe Verenero, one unidentified man.


Five Dead As Result of Mine Explosion
By the Associated Press
Aberdeen Daily American, Aberdeen, SD
November 12, 1910

Hillsboro, Ill., -- Five men are dead and eighteen injured as the result of an explosion in a mine of the Shoal Creek Coal Company of Chicago, at Panama, twelve miles north of here today.  Four of the men were killed outright and the fifth died from injuries later.  He was an Italian who was so mangled as to be unrecognizable.  Rassel Romanio, miner, still is in the shaft.

Gas, which had accumulated overnight in a pocket several hundred feet from the mouth of the mine, exploded before 9 o’clock, tearing out timber and shaking the earth for miles around.

No serious fire followed.  Men who escaped death were injured by falling slate and flames from the explosion.  About 300 men were at work in and about the mine, most of them being outside and away from danger.  Fifty men in the entry of the shaft were rescued by other mines.



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