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Death in US Mines - Historic View


Mine Safety in the NewsHere's what they were saying about mine safety "Back in the Day."  The list below is a chronology of vintage articles from newspapers across the nation about mine fatalities in the United States and efforts to improve mine safety.  The early efforts by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) and the Mine Enforcement and Safety Administration (MESA) are chronicled through archived articles from 1910 to 1977.

— 1910 —

New Bureau of Mines is Now at Work
Will Conduct Investigations and Co-Operate with Mine Operators and Miners to Render Less Risk of Life
July 31, 1910

New Bureau of Mines
Joseph Austin Holmes Appointed by President
September 1, 1910

Life Savers for Miners
Training Men and Cars Specially Constructed
October 31, 1910

— 1911 —

Death in the Coal Mines
Highest Rate in the World in North America
February 4, 1911

Underground Wireless: Messages Sent Between German Mine Over a Mile Apart
March 24, 1911
Note: Not a USA milestone, however, may prove useful in a game of trivia.

30,000 Miners Expected at Great Meet
July 16, 1911

President Taft will witness a mine explosion at Forbes Field
September 17, 1911

Plans for Big Celebration Complete
40,000 Miners and Experts Expected at Forbes Field Demonstration Tomorrow
October 29, 1911

— 1912 —

Miners' Welfare Cause of Taft
Bureau of Mines Marks Great Step Forward
April 12, 1912

Hazardous Career of Life Savers
April 20, 1912

Mine Death Rate is Less
American Coal Industry Has Passed High Mark of Death and is Progressing Toward Safety
July 1, 1912

A Pennsylvania Mine Slander Refuted
November 21, 1912

— 1913 —

2,360 Coal Miners Killed Last Year
But Bureau of Mines States Number Killed Was Lowest Since 1906
May 11, 1913

Deaths Reduced in Mining
December 24, 1913

Michigan and Minnesota Mines Prevent Accidents
December 27, 1913

— 1914 —

Coal Mining is Still Dangerous
Much Room for Improvement in Conditions in American Mines
May 7, 1914

List of Mine Casualties
Alarmingly Great During 1913, Number is Discredit to Industry Says Expert
December 2, 1914

— 1915 —

Casualty List in Coal Mines Decreases
February 24, 1915

Tale of Rescue is Told by Official
Bureau of Mines Explains How 47 Workmen Escape Death
April 4, 1915

Check Death's Harvest
Great Progress Made in Mine Precaution
December 4, 1915

— 1919 —

Pageant to Mark Dedication of U.S. Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh
August 24, 1919

— 1921 —

Bureau of Mines Work is Reviewed
April 12, 1921

Bureau of Mines Makes Report on Explosive Dusts
September 24, 1921

— 1922 —

Few Lives Lost in Mines in 1921
Lowest Record Since 1903 is Made in Collieries Last Year
February 14, 1922

Coal Mine Fatalities Drop
Decrease of 26 Per Cent Sown in Bureau Report for January
March 31, 1922

Coal Mine Fatalities in February Show Increase
March 31, 1922

— 1923 —

1,950 Coal Mine Deaths for 1922
Many Big Disasters Occur During Year Despite Efforts to Promote Safety
February 17, 1923

— 1924 —

Fewer Coal Miners Killed During 1923
May 3, 1924

— 1929 —

Mine Accidents Take 148 Lives
June 30, 1929

Mine Disaster Loss Too High
State Officials Disappointed at Slight Death Decrease
September 29, 1929

— 1930 —

Mines' Death Rate Lowered
Safety Methods and Results Explained at Coal Institute Here
September 13, 1930

— 1933 —

Mine Deaths Gain as Output Slumps
November 11, 1933

— 1934 —

Fewer Fatalities in Mines During 1933
March 31, 1934

— 1937 —

Death in Mines
March 14, 1937

— 1940 —

Mine Safety Held Periled by Politics
January 29, 1940

— 1947 —

Mine Conditions are Better but They're Nothing to Brag About
March 31, 1947

Federal Coal Mine Safety Code has "Clean-Up" Clause
April 2, 1947

Coal Mining Death Rate Decreasing
April 19, 1947

— 1955 —

Mine Fatalities Hit Record Low
January 24, 1955

25 Mine Fatalities Boost Total to 378
December 23, 1955

— 1956 —

Rock Deaths in Mines Up
May 29, 1956

233 Mine Deaths in Six Months
July 26, 1956

— 1958 —

Mine Fatalities Lowest in Years
April 22, 1958

— 1968 —

Lethal Coal Dust is Threat
Bureau of Mines Drags Heels
May 17, 1968

— 1969 —

Coal Mine Safety Measure Approved
October 30, 1969

— 1970 —

Death in the Coal Mines
July 6, 1970

— 1971 —

Coal Mine Safety Program Proposed
February 1, 1971

Mines Bureau Accused of Neglecting Safety Laws
June 1, 1971

Miners' Death Rate Takes Sharp Upturn
Nearly Doubles in 2-Month Period After 25-Year Safety Record Set
September 8, 1971

Increase of Mine Fatals Ruins Early Hopes of New Safety Record
September 13, 1971

Deaths in Deep Mines Up Over Totals in 1970
December 24, 1971

— 1972 —

Coal Mining Death Rate Fell in 1971
January 11, 1972

Major Mine Disasters Likely to be Reduced
October 27, 1972

— 1974 —

Day Defends Mine Safety
September 12, 1974

Coal Mine Death Rate at New Low
December 16, 1974

— 1975 —

Mine Mishaps Decline to Record Levels
April 7, 1975

Bureacratic Feud is Rekindled
May 28, 1975

Fatality Rate Among Coal Miners on the Rise
November 11, 1975

— 1976 —

Miners Don't Dig Training Plan Idea
July 15, 1976

— 1977 —

Coal Mine Deaths Drop in 1976; 144 are Killed
January 4, 1977

Safety in Mines Subject of Bills
February 23, 1977

Mine Enforcement Transfer Urged
April 1, 1977

— 1982 —

Experimental Mine Opens for Tests on Safety
September 2, 1982


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